Michigan criminal defense attorney

Domestic Violence Lies, Divorce Truths and What You Need To Know

Gavel and wedding rings depicting  Domestic Violence Lies, Divorce Truths and What You Need To Know

Have you been charged with domestic violence?

There are some men out there who are using the legal system to get the upper hand in their divorce proceedings.

An article in Forbes outlines several ways in which men try to gain the upper hand:

  • “Conflicting out” all the top divorce lawyers.
  • Stalling and delaying.
  • Exerting pressure to proceed too quickly.
  • Denying access to financial resources.
  • Hiding assets.
  • Failing to pay court-ordered support or refusing to relinquish assets.

There are two more, detailed more specifically:

  • Claiming their wives are abusers
  • Coerced Debt

All of these issues are worth talking about. Men can and do use these things to gain the advantage in a divorce situation. Women who are already victims in their marriages can fall prey to further victimization in divorce.

However, what about when wives are the abusers? I’m here to tell you: this is real.

Domestic Violence Lies Busted: Who Hits More?

As a nation, we are talking much more about different forms abuse can take. Have you heard the term gaslighting? How about micro-aggressions?

However you feel about these terms, they are more frequently part of discussions about domestic violence than ever. Domestic violence isn’t defined only by physical or sexual abuse in our state law. If a wife can testify to forms of control or isolation by her partner, she is on her way to claiming domestic violence. The same goes for intimidation or threats.

Women have more freedom than ever to claim domestic abuse. Women also have more resources than ever, and they are more readily believed than ever when claiming domestic violence.

However, the most recent CDC study shows that more men are victims of domestic violence than women. In fact, the research into domestic violence since the 1970s has demonstrated that both men and women participate in domestic violence at roughly the same rates.

The incidents of domestic violence against women has dropped more than 50% since 1994 when Congress passed the Violence Against Women Act. The law made a necessary change. However, violence against men has remained the same.

Who Is Using The System?

Furthermore, women show a pattern of using physical violence at higher rates than men do against women. When men suffer domestic violence, they are much more likely to be seriously injured and to need hospitalization. Studies show that women who abuse are more likely to slap or bite or kick or to throw or use a heavy or sharp object.

When police are called to a domestic dispute, men are much more likely to be ordered out of their homes, threatened with arrest, or arrested. Sometimes men are arrested even when they are the ones who made the call to police.

Why aren’t men getting more help?

Studies also show that men tend not to think of themselves as victims. There is a stigma attached to admitting you are suffering abuse by a woman. Men are also, rightly, afraid of being punished for something their wives or partners are doing to them.

In addition, there aren’t many states in the U.S. that offer domestic violence shelters for men.

Have you been charged with domestic violence?

Are you afraid of what this means for your divorce?

Custody battles can be one of the most frightening aspects for men being accused of domestic violence in divorce. The good news is that the State of Michigan wants to keep children with both parents as much as possible. Any domestic violence charge will be taken into account during custody proceedings, but it won’t determine your entire future with your children.

The other good news is that Attorney David J. Kramer has will work hard to get the truth known if this is your situation. If you have any questions about domestic violence or divorce, call today and get the help you deserve.

Contact my office today.

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This article was published on: July 20, 2018 and was last modified July 20, 2018