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MLB Introduces New Policy on Domestic Violence Sexual, Assault, and Child Abuse

MLB Introduces New Policy on Domestic Violence

Last year, you could not have missed the Ray Rice scandal or the Adrian Peterson scandal. Now, the MLB is responding with a new policy for domestic violence, sexual assault, and child abuse.

“Players are husbands, fathers, sons and boyfriends. And as such want to set an example that makes clear that there is no place for domestic abuse in our society,” said MLBPA Executive Director Tony Clark. ~ Reported by Review Journal

Major Legal Baseball and the Major Legal Baseball Association Announce New Policy

Back in August, the Major Legal Baseball and the Major Legal Baseball Association announced the new policy for domestic violence, sexual assault, and child abuse. The policy is a 13-page document that was signed back in August.

According to the Review Journal, the policy announcement states that if a player commits an act of domestic violence, sexual assault, or child abuse, the MLB Commissioner, Rob Manfred, will now have the authority to discipline that player.

Under this new policy, the Commissioner can hand out whatever punishment he feels appropriate, as there is no minimum or maximum penalty. The discipline will not be base upon a criminal conviction.

CBS reports that the disciplinary power that lies with the commissioner is the only similarity with the Nation Football League. Unlike the NFL, the commissioner will not be acting like the “judge, jury, and executioner.”

Instead there will be a three-person panel. This will include a representative from both the MLBPA and the league and as CBS reported an “impartial arbitrator to hear all appeals of punishments.”

According to ESPN, the Commissioner can place a player on “administrated leave” for up to seven days if the player has been accused of domestic violence, sexual assault, or child abuse and before a disciplinary decision. The commissioner can also choose to defer a disciplinary decision until after the criminal charges have been resolved.

If there is a suspension upheld, it will be without pay and again there are no maximum or minimum penalties. ESPN also reported that the players will not receive service time for their suspension.

In addition, the policy has created a joint policy board that will provide treatment. Treatment includes mandated counseling and psychological evaluation, according to ESPN. The board will consist of three experts along with two members that the MLB will appoint and two members appointed by the union. One of the members will submit a treatment plan to the board for approval. If players do not comply with their treatment plans, they could be subjected to discipline.

In an article by the SBNation, the author Mike Bates writes that the MLB’s record with domestic violence is worse than the NFLs. The article provides information on the Twins and Yankees second basemen, Chuck Knowblauch, was also arrested for domestic violence.

Take Away

The MLB is hopeful that this new policy will “deter future violence, promote victim safety, and serve as a step toward a better understanding of the causes and consequences of domestic violence, sexual assault, and child abuse.”

Over to You

What do you make of this new policy?

This article was published on: October 16, 2015 and was last modified October 17, 2015