Michigan criminal defense attorney

Two Confessions, Four Murders in Detroit

2 Confessions 4 Murders

Picture this, the police were at a drug house in Detroit where four murders had been committed. A 14-year-old boy with one eye and a learning disability walks up and strikes up a conversation with a police officer. The next thing that happens before anyone knows, the boy is being arrested for having confessed to the murders of the 4 people who were killed. This case has an interesting twist. The boy’s confession is not the only one.

Davontae Sanford is not eligible for parole until 2046 for having confessed to a crime in his neighborhood in 2007 and then pleading guilty to second degree murder that next year. For many cops and prosecutors this is an open and shut case.

Until Vincent Smothers, who is currently serving a prison sentence for killing 8 people, also confessed to the same drug house murders.

Here is what the Detroit Free Press reported,

Prosecutors never charged Smothers and instead have repeatedly stuck by Sanford’s guilty plea. A Wayne County judge has refused to allow Sanford to withdraw that plea or allow Smothers to be transported to court from prison to testify. Appeals court Judge David Sawyer suggested Smothers’ testimony would present a more complete picture of the case. “There is a chance there is an innocent person in jail, in prison. … That’s my major concern here. We’re looking at a very lengthy prison term,” Sawyer said of Sanford.”

Are you looking for more details about this case? According to the same article in the Detroit Free Press, one of the guns used in the murders was found at the home of Smothers’ accomplice.
The Michigan Court of Appeals is considering allowing the testimony of Smothers, a known Detroit hit man. Smothers who once killed a Detroit Police officer’s wife for $50, is offering to speak and clear Sanford’s name.

What do you think?

Should the court hear the testimony? Please share your thoughts in the comment section below.

This article was published on: August 7, 2013 and was last modified August 8, 2013