Michigan criminal defense attorney

Catty Co-Workers and Embezzlement Charges

Accused

Has anyone ever accused you of doing something that you didn’t do?

Do you have any catty co-workers?

I think everyone can relate to having co-workers gossip about them. But, gossip is usually harmless, unless that co-worker is gossiping to the police about how you have been stealing from your employer.

This was the situation one woman walked into. MLive reports,

A 7-Eleven store representative in early July contacted the Bay County Sheriff’s office, claiming an employee was stealing funds. The representative said Montgomery, an employee at the location at 6275 Westside Saginaw Road, had been pilfering money for about two months, court records show. An audit of the convenience store conducted on July 24 revealed a shortage of about $6,000, court records show.

Mandi Montgomery is a 24-year-old who is now facing a charge that could land her 5 years in prison.

That same representative said that Montgomery had stolen $1,500 – $2,000 of the missing money. When the police accused the 24-year-old, she denied any involvement and said she would be speaking to a lawyer before saying anything else.

What the representative has yet to deliver is any proof of Montgomery’s involvement, how he knew she was stealing and what she is only responsible for up to a third of the missing money.

Myths About Speaking To A Lawyer

One thing that Montgomery has going for her is her request to speak with a lawyer before saying anything besides declaring her innocence. There are a few myths that surround the request to speak with a lawyer including:

  • Only the guilty ask to speak with a lawyer.
  • You only ask to speak to a lawyer when you are somehow involved.

Neither statement is true. Choosing to have a lawyer present allows you and your statements to be protected. If you are ever accused of something that you did not do, having a lawyer by your side could prove critical for your case.

This article was published on: January 23, 2013 and was last modified January 23, 2013